Geoff Sutcliffe

Professor of Computer Science, University of Miami

Geoff Sutcliffe is a Professor and the Chair of the Department of Computer Science at the University of Miami. He received a BSc(Hons) and MSc from the University of Natal, and a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Western Australia. His research is in the area of Automated Reasoning, particularly in the evaluation and effective use of automated reasoning systems. His most prominent achievements are: the first ever development of a heterogeneous parallel deduction system, leading to the development of the SSCPA automated reasoning system; the development and ongoing maintenance of the TPTP problem library, which is now the de facto standard for testing classical logic automated reasoning systems; the development and ongoing organization of the CADE ATP System Competition - the world championship for classical logic automated reasoning systems; and the specification of the TPTP language standards for automated reasoning tools. The research has been supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the German Ministry for Research, the Australian Research Council, the European Union, and internal university grants from Edith Cowan University, James Cook University, and the University of Miami. The research has produced over 125 refereed journal, conference, and workshop papers. He is an editor of Acta Informatica and the Formalised Mathematics journal, and has been guest editor of several special journal issues on topics in automated reasoning. He has contributed to the automated reasoning and artificial intelligence communities as a conference or program chair of (several instances of) the International Conference on Automated Deduction (CADE), the International Conference on Logic for Programming Artificial Intelligence and Reasoning (LPAR), and the International Florida Artificial Intelligence Research Society (FLAIRS). He was co-founder and organizer of the "ES*" series of workshops on Empirically Successful Automated Reasoning. He regularly serves as a program committee member and reviewer for automated reasoning and artificial intelligence journals and conferences. He has served three terms as a CADE trustee, is on the LPAR steering committee, is on the Linking Research Globally (LRG) steering committee, and is currently the president of FLAIRS. As a faculty member at the University of Miami he serves on the university curriculum committee, and is currently chair of the College of Arts and Sciences curriculum committee.